Do you have adult acne? Avoid these 19 types of food.

Adult acne is common, and treating adult acne with the right topical ingredients can help you kick acne to the curb. But alongside following the right anti-acne treatment plan, it's also essential for adults with acne to put the right ingredients INSIDE their body. What you eat can make an impact on your skin, and so these are the foods all adults with acne should stay away from.

First, try to avoid cow's milk and dairy (Including cheeses made from cow's milk). Milk proteins are full of growth hormones. These hormones promote the clogging of the skin's oil glands. Try a dairy-free milk alternative like almond milk or coconut milk instead.

The other big food group to avoid is foods that rank high on the glycemic index. Foods with a high glycemic index are rapidly absorbed, and as a result, there's an increase in sebum levels and a release of more insulin. This can cause breakouts. No one wants that! Wondering specifically which foods are high on the glycemic index? Here they are:

  1. Most breakfast cereals
  2. Snack chips
  3. Croutons
  4. Flour tortillas
  5. Pastries, like muffins
  6. Desserts rich in sugar and made with white flour can cause breakouts, too. Be careful with the following:
  7. Pies
  8. Cakes
  9. Cookies
  10. Sugar-sweetened candies
  11. Ice cream
  12. Processed and concentrated fruit products can trigger acne breakouts as well. Which foods are these, exactly? They include:
  13. Raisins
  14. Fruit juices
  15. Fruit "leather" strips
  16. Sports drinks
  17. Sweetened Soda
  18. Sweetened Lemonade
  19. Sweetened Iced tea

So, what should you eat to keep your adult acne under control? Fresh fruits, veggies, lean meats, and fish are good alternatives to high-glycemic foods and drinks.

More info on adult acne.

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